NY Daily News: Jimmy Henchman is a snitch /Phresh
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NY Daily News: Jimmy Henchman is a snitch

September 13th, 2010 | by Staff

Awkward. According to the New York Daily News one of the rap industry’s behind-the-scenes players is a closeted snitch.

Czar Entertainment honcho Jimmy Rosemond, better known as Jimmy Henchman, who manages the careers of several rappers and counts Game as one of his client was outed by the paper as a government informant, having allegedly cooperated with state and federal law enforcement officials a number of times since the mid-1990s.

Jimmy Rosemond poses with hip hop artist Wyclef Jean
Tattletale Jimmy Rosemond poses with hip hop artist Wyclef Jean

If true, the allegation would run contrary to the ‘Stop Snitchin’ mantra that many misguided rapper cling to — Game even released a 2005 album titled “Stop Snitchin/Stop Lyin.”

The paper points out that Rosemond’s former attorney tried using his client’s past history of cooperating with law enforcement as a basis to gain leniency for Rosemond in a Los Angeles gun case.

But Rosemond’s new lawyer, Jeffrey Lichtman, insists his client is no stool pigeon,
“The fact is that prosecutors later claimed he flat-out lied to them, and they weren’t happy about it.
“He met with [federal prosecutors] for a single session, but there are plenty of reasons people meet with prosecutors. His lawyer at the time inflated what happened in an attempt to get a better sentence, and it didn’t work.”

Michael Monks, Jeffrey Jones and John C. Reilly in 1992's 'Out on a Limb'.
Rapper and former “Change of Heart” contestant Game, in this 2005 record “Stop Snitchin/Stop Lyin”, urges fans to let crime run rampant in there neighborhoods.

According to the NY Daily News Rosemond’s list of dime dropping include,

• While Rosemond was held on a drug and gun case in North Carolina in 1996, four inmates plotted a jailbreak and asked him to join. He alerted authorities and spent several days in solitary to avoid retribution, his lawyer at the time wrote in court papers obtained by The News from federal archives.

• In 1997, facing bail jumping charges in New York, Rosemond gave information about crooked jail officials who altered paperwork to let him post bail.
He made “several monitored phone calls to one of the correction officers,” but the target was suspicious and “reluctant to speak with Mr. Rosemond,” court papers said.

Lichtman contends his client to no snitch saying Rosemond “never signed a cooperation agreement.’

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